Punk stalwarts The Cravats have been around since 1978 and kick the evening off with their short, sharp punky diatribes peppered with honking, squeaking sax. The band is made up of drums, bass, lead guitar, saxophone, vocalist The Shend and a guy sitting with his back to the audience reading a newspaper. Their sound echoes around the cavernous surroundings of the Dome as it slowly fills up, but they gamely plough through a spiky set of uptempo tunes.

UK rapper Cappo is up next, a UK Hip Hop veteran and stalwart of the Notts scene which has always been a vibrant and vital part of the history of UK Hip Hop. The scene up in Rock City, Nottingham has been documented in the film “NG83 – When We Were B Boys” which is currently doing the rounds, and Cappo is a part of that story. My only gripe is that his set and the music sounds pretty much the same on each track, bass heavy, slow head nodding beats that give Cappo plenty of room to show his lyrical dexterity. He brings out two other MCs and as “Triple V” the three of them perform over more of the same types of beats. It’s good, just not wholly engaging or particularly dynamic.

After a short break, a burst of fanfare announces the arrival of Jason Williamson and Andrew Fearn, aka Sleaford Mods, onto the stage. They’ve got a new five track E.P. out called “TCR” and proceed to perform a blistering set comprising this new material alongside their older tunes. News songs like “Britain Thirst” and “You’re a Nottshead” continue their winning formula of Andrew’s abrasive bass heavy production and Jason’s rapid-fire witty observations of life in a country that tells us “we’re all in this together” while institutions like banks are rewarded for failing as others barely get by with the aid of food banks.

Early problems with Williamson’s vocals through the house P.A. are soon forgotten and the uptempo beats quickly lead to some moshing at the front of the stage. My only criticism is than the set feels a little short, but the frenetic pace that Williamson employs to deliver his reams of lyrics means that each song is over in double quick time.

They encore with “Jobseeker”, “Tied Up In Notts” and “Tweet, Tweet, Tweet”, a great triple whammy that would serve as the perfect introduction to the band for the uninitiated. This is the third time I’ve seen them in Brighton and each time it’s been in a slightly larger venue. The Brighton Dome felt a little too big for what they do, their uptempo and intense performance being better suited to getting closer to the stage in smaller venues, but they’re still more entertaining and much more relevant than many of the bands around at the moment.

Peace.

The Cravats

Cappo

Seaford Mods


Advertisements