UK punky Reggae band The Skints are putting on their own party here in Hackney, North-East London tonight. They’ve got an array of acts lined up as well as the Reggae Roast Sound System featuring Brother Culture, Tippa Irie and Earl Gateshead from Trojan Records.

Support comes from New Kingston, a Brooklyn quartet comprising three brothers playing drums, guitar and keyboards with their Dad on bass. They’ve released three albums to date, with the  latest “New Kingston” out at the moment. Their blend of jazzy Reggae is uptempo and rootsy, something that would go down well at festivals as well as on the radio. They can all play well, taking it turns to solo and showcase their skills. They also all share vocal duties, presenting a lively set that gets the crowd moving.

The Reggae Roast Sound System keeps the place jumping in between acts, with long standing deejays Tippa Irie and Brother Culture trading rapid fire toasts and boasts.

Next up are the party hosts themselves. Joshua (on guitar and vocals) says that they’ve recently returned from playing some American dates and are happy to be back in the UK where they can get a decent cup of tea. Their sound is basically a mix of Grime, Dub, Ska, Reggae and Punk, and they’ve managed to blend all these influences into a sound that is uniquely their own yet completely representative of multi-racial Britain.

They don’t really have a front person, vocals come from Jamie the drummer, Joshua or Marcia, with Jonathan Doyle anchoring the songs with some heavyweight bass. As well as vocals Marcia also plays flute, alto saxophone, melodica, percussive samples and keyboards depending on the song. Their third album is entitled “FM” and like previous album “Part And Parcel” it’s produced by Brighton Reggae heavyweight producer Price Fatty.

As Tippa Irie is in the house, they play “Tazer Beam” and “This Town”, both of which feature the UK deejay. A veteran of the Saxon Sound System alongside Smiley Culture, Tippa Irie is an energetic and confident performer who gets the crowd going with his enthusiastic patter.

The crowd are here for The Skints though, and as they blast through their old and new songs it’s clear that they’ve got a big London following, with a very vocal crowd singing along for the entire set. A lively homecoming gig from a good live band.

London born Marla Brown, daughter of Reggae icon Dennis Brown, comes on stage to perform one song and gets a big welcome before Jesse Royal closes the show.

His brand of Roots Reggae is firmly in the vein of Protoje, Chronixx and Jah 9 and is a perfect way to end the evening. His band consists of drumns, bass, rhythm guitar, lead guitar and  keyboards and they provide a solid and danceable backing as Jesse “The Small Axe” delivers an energetic set. He went to school with Daniel Marley, son of Ziggy, and was mentored to some extent by members of the Marley family.

“Modern Day Judas” is still his most outstanding song for me, but all the songs performed tonight were uplifting without being preachy.

A great night out with some excellent acts all on the same bill. If The Skints put on another party definitely go check it out if you can get there.

Peace.

Reggae Roast

New Kingston

Tippa Irie

The Skints

Jesse Royal

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